Frequently Asked Questions

Here are the most frequent questions we receive. We hope you find the answers to any questions you may have here. If not, please submit a question here and we will respond to you as soon as possible.

Answers:

  1. Where can cameras be installed?
    Anywhere.

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  2. Can I really view my cameras from anywhere?
    Yes, you can monitor your cameras from any computer that has access to the internet, so you can keep an eye on things when you're not there.

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  3. Can other people view my cameras without my knowledge?
    No. In order to access your cameras a user must know the camera server's exact IP address or domain name, as well as log in with a username and password of your choosing. The only way for someone to access your cameras would be if you gave this information to them, therefore we suggest that you never divulge the IP address, username or password to anyone that you wouldn't want to be able to access your cameras whenever and from wherever they wanted.

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  4. Is it true some insurance companies will offer discounts due to the installation of cameras?
    Yes, depending on your insurance company. Some insurance companies offer discounts at varying rates.

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  5. How far back can I view archived footage?
    A very large amount of time, but this depends on the amount of memory the DVR hard drive possesses. The larger the hard drive, the farther back you can view footage.

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  6. Can iCam cameras be hidden?
    Yes, practically anywhere or inside anything.

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  7. Is night vision available?
    Yes.

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  8. Do I need a High-Speed Internet Connection to use the cameras?
    No, but it is highly recommended. When viewing remotely, the refresh rate is restricted by the internet connection speed that you are viewing from. A dial up connection does not provide a wide enough bandwidth for streaming video very well. At best on dial up you may get 1 to 2 frames every 5 seconds. A DSL or cable modem connection can generally display 1 frame per second.

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  9. What is "frames per second"?
    Frames per second (fps) relates to how many pictures the DVR will record in a second. Real time recording is about 30 fps on each camera. To calculate the fps per camera take the total fps in the system and divide it by the number of video inputs. For example, a 60 fps digital video recorder with 4 video inputs would result in about 15 fps per camera. The technology has finally gotten to the point now where real time recording is affordable. Unless there is a budgetary restriction, we will always initially quote a DVR that can record at a rate of 30 fps across all cameras in your system. If you are recording cash registers or something similar then you should definitely invest in real time recording.

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  10. How does a CCTV digital video recorder work?
    A CCTV digital video recorder (or “DVR” for short) is essentially a computer that saves video images to a hard drive. Most cameras in use today capture an analog picture. The DVR converts the analog signal to digital and then compresses it.

    Many cameras can be connected to one DVR. DVRs generally come with 4, 8, 16, or 32 camera inputs. The DVR will allow you to view all of these images at once or one at a time, and all of the video is saved to the hard drive. Additional switches, quads, or multiplexers are not required.

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  11. What is the difference between a PC-based DVR and a standalone DVR?
    A PC-based digital video recorder is basically a personal computer that has been modified with hardware and software to work as a DVR, and therefore is able to be customized and provides many more options than a standalone. A standalone digital video recorder is a machine that has been manufactured specifically to work as a DVR. In a standalone DVR there is typically one circuit board with software burned into the chip, allowing only the options that were originally programmed into it.

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